The list of the Seven Wonders of the World is intended to offer universal recognition to the most outstanding sights and structures. The New 7 Wonders Foundation was established in 2007 to determine the new list based on votes cast by individuals all around the world.

The Great Wall of China, Petra in Jordan, the Colosseum in Rome, Chichen Itza in Mexico, Machu Picchu in Peru, the Taj Mahal in India, and Christ the Redeemer in Brazil are among the new seven wonders (Brazil). There is no doubt that these landmarks deserve to be included on the list. But did you know that the first list of the seven wonders was compiled in the 2nd century BC? The original list is known as the “seven wonders of the ancient world.”

Antipater of Sidon, a 2nd-century Greek poet, developed a list of the most spectacular structures of the day. His poems and writings functioned as guidebooks for Greek tourists. Of course, there was no such thing as Trip Advisor or social media back then. As a result, tourists must rely solely on guide books to select their destinations. Because ancient tourists could only travel short distances the seven marvels are all clustered around Mesopotamia and the Mediterranean. But why limit yourself to just seven? There are more impressive sights on the globe, but why seven? The number seven is considered lucky among the Greeks. Even today, the number seven represents perfection and fortune.

This is when the ultimate “must-see” list of the world’s seven wonders was born. A collection of the best examples of human creativity, beautiful architecture, and brilliant engineering undertaken by various Hellenic authors in guidebooks and poems dating from the first to second centuries BC. Philo of Byzantium, Herodotus, Callimachus of Cyrene, and Antipater of Sidon all contributed to the list of the Seven Wonders of the World.

Even though the third-largest twelve years the most of the Seven Wonders have fallen into disrepair, they have continued to inspire brilliant artists to employ their imagination and bring the intangible relics of Earth’s early civilizations to life. Budget Direct decided to provide current culture enthusiasts with the opportunity to explore the grand old structures through a series of photo-realistic 3D models.

Statue of Zeus

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Image via: Budget Direct

The spectacular artwork which featured the God of Thunder on a throne and stood 43 feet tall was an attempt to overshadow the Athenians, but it did not last long. The cedar throne and timber frame were demolished in 426CE, and the magnificent gold, ivory, ebony, and valuable stone ornaments are now lost, believed stolen.

Hanging Gardens of Babylon

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Image via: Budget Direct

The Hanging Gardens of Babylon, according to legend, were erected near the Euphrates River in modern-day Iraq as a present from Babylonian King Nebuchadnezzar to his wife, Amytis, who was homesick for the lush highlands of the Median Empire. We don’t know if it’s a fairytale or a true story but the gardens appeared to be a green paradise on Earth.

Lighthouse of Alexandria

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Image via: Budget Direct

The magnificent Lighthouse of Alexandria commanded by Ptolemy I and erected between 300 and 280 BCE by Sostratus of Cnidus, is thought to be the world’s first lighthouse. This magnificent structure (330 feet tall) was for centuries the world’s third-largest structure after the Giza pyramids. Between the 12th and late 15th centuries, earthquakes eventually demolished it.

Mausoleum at Halicarnassus

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Image via: Budget Direct

This was constructed for Mausolus, King of Caria, and was so magnificent that the late ruler’s name became a word for a massive burial monument. Around 350 BCE, the spectacular 148-foot tomb was built in modern-day Bodrum. The edifice was made of white marble and mirrored Greek, Egyptian, and Lycian architectural characteristics. The Mausoleum rapidly deteriorated as a result of repeated earthquakes in the 13th century.

Great Pyramid of Giza

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Image via: Budget Direct

Nowadays, no one is impressed when we talk about the highest buildings, yet it took modern man until the nineteenth century to build a taller building than the Great Pyramid of Giza which held the record of being the world’s tallest man-made structure for more than four thousand years. In 2560 BCE, this 481-foot-tall pyramid was built on 13 acres as a mausoleum for Egyptian pharaoh Khufu.

Temple of Artemis at Ephesus

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Image via: Budget Direct

This Greek goddess of chastity, hunting, wild animals, forests, and fertility was built and destroyed three times: first by Herostratus in an act of attention-seeking arson; then by the Goths, who destroyed the city on the run; and finally, by the Christians in 401 CE, who left only the foundations and a single column, which can still be visited today in Turkey.

Colossus of Rhodes

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Image via: Budget Direct

Chares of Lindos sculpted the Colossus as a symbol of togetherness over twelve years beginning in 304 BC. It was a 104-foot-tall triumphal statue of the Greek sun-god Helios constructed over Rhodes’ Mandraki Harbour on 49-foot marble pedestals that allowed ships to pass between his legs. Only 56 years later, the massive statue was destroyed by a violent earthquake. The monument deteriorated for nearly a millennium until it was melted down and sold for scrap by the Muslim ruler Muawiyah following the Arab invasion.

Source of the information: www.budgetdirect.com.au