Artist Dave Pollot takes generally neglected second-hand shop canvases and changes them into his very own artful wonders. By consistently incorporating components from pop society, the scenes including still lives, vessels adrift, and bucolic scenes are given a dreamlike wind with increases like street food, SpongeBob, and beasts from horror movies.

The progressing venture began in 2012 as a joke among Pollot and his wife. It was a challenge by him to himself to take a bit of undesirable fine art, and without changing its actual beauty, transform it into something that individuals needed to claim. This began his “obsession” with painting, and he’s been changing works from that point onward.

Pollot sees his second hand shop changes as building another story inside the previously existing creation. “I’ve always loved the idea that art is deeply personal,” Pollot discloses to My Modern Met. “I’m telling my own story with each piece, but everyone is a little bit like a mirror, reflecting its meaning back to the viewer through his or her individual perception.”

On a bigger scale, Pollot’s portfolio makes us consider a work of art’s place all through time. “I think that my body of work has challenged the idea that any single piece of artwork is without a place, especially if it can be retrofitted to reflect a more culturally relevant set of ideas,” he states. “It’s also questioned the idea of who (generationally and otherwise) can claim ownership of the pop culture of a given time period—it’s sought to introduce a younger audience to older artistic styles and a potentially older audience to a broader set of pop culture.”

Artist Dave Pollot takes discarded second-hand shop artistic creations and changes them into pop society motivated contemporary art.

Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart
Credits: davepollotart

A fundraiser was recently concluded by Pollot regarding artist Maurizio Cattelan’s installation Comedian that took place at Miami Art Basel.

Credits: davepollotart

Cattelan protected a banana to the wall with pipe tape, sold with a cost somewhere in the range of $120,000 and $150,000. “Contemporary art can be, well, interesting,” Pollot reports in an article published on Instagram. “What’s even more ridiculous is that these things can happen while people have little or nothing to eat.” accordingly, he painted a monster banana duct-taped to mountains and sold it through his Instagram. Pollot’s work of art sold for $4,500, with 90% of the value heading off to The Hunger Project.

Dave Pollot: Website | Instagram | Facebook