Mountain Bluebird was introduced as ‘The Nevada State Bird’ in 1967. This bird is identified as one of the most prettiest birds in the West because of the amazing blue feathers it possesses. The Mountain Bluebirds love to live in the open areas. They are easily found in mountainous terrains and seen in prairie lands and deserts too. The location for building the nest is decided by the female bird and these nests are generally built in a variety of cavities in trees, cliffs or on the soil. The female birds perform most of the role of building their nests as per the details found out. The male birds have been identified mostly as ‘pretending’ to help at the task of building nests and but to lose their building materials.

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These Mountain Bluebirds are found very often in the western United States and Canada, mostly during the season of their breeding that makes them a very familiar sign to symbolize the arrival of spring. The population of the bluebirds was to show decline in the 20th century but it has gained back its position in a small number. As they build up their nests in cavities without paying much attention building up their own, deforestation and modern agricultural practices have directly influenced the loss of their nesting sites. Thanks to the conservation efforts with “nest boxes” they are being helped immensely at nesting. These Bluebirds are considered to be aggressive and the look of the face made me believe this without any doubt. It looks alright for us because appreciation from far is better.

If you are in their territorial location of breeding you can enjoy the sight of this nesting season from your own yard, by building your own nesting boxes for them.

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According to The American Bird Conservancy, the forging of the Mountain Bluebird and Falcon compares to be similar. These birds feed themselves by the food on the ground by catching a variety of insects and berries. This special behavior which is unique to them positions themselves special among the other birds.

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